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Posts Tagged ‘birmingham’

Wow! So, I’ve had this blog up since my essay collection was published by Benu Press in March. Through Wednesday, I’d had about 2,000 visits to the blog, total, with the largest day bringing about 160 views to an essay I wrote in the wake of the April 27 Tornado Outbreak. Yesterday morning, before I’d even had my coffee, I heard of the passing of Civil Rights icon Fred Shuttlesworth. My breakfast ruminations over the deaths of Shuttlesworth and Steve Jobs occurring on the same day led to an idea, which led to me holing myself up in my study and going on a writing binge of sorts. Around 2:30 p.m., hungry and thirsty and bleary-eyed, I posted “Fred and Steve.” The last time I checked, over 1,000 people had read the piece.

If you are one of those visitors, I sincerely thank you for taking the time to read that essay, check out my blog, and tell your friends. If you are interested in learning more about leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, my book, Confederate Streets, explores the history of Nashville, Tennessee, through the lens of someone who was born in the late 1970s. I was born after the movement, but the work of desegregation was far from over and, like most Nashvillians (especially those of us who attended public schools), the work of the Civil Rights leaders and those who opposed them affected virtually every facet of my life. (The book’s title comes from the fact that segregationists named all the streets in my neighborhood after Confederate leaders and battles shortly after the 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education) You can find my book on amazon.com or, conveniently enough considering yesterday’s post, read it on your i-something for the low price of $4.99.

Even before people started sharing my work on Facebook yesterday, I was looking forward to this month as it connects to my writing career. You see, this time next week I will be on my way to Nashville to participate in a panel discussion at the Southern Festival of Books! I first attended the Festival in October 1994, when I was a junior in high school. It was just a short walk from my high school, Hume-Fogg Academic Magnet. We were given free rein and little supervision, but, being good little nerds, we all stayed around. I remember it as a spiritual awakening of sorts. I walked from table to table there on War Memorial Plaza, spoke with authors, and realized they were real people. I remember wandering around in that slanting autumn light and thinking to myself, “I can do this. I can be here someday.”

Someday” comes next Friday, October 14, at 1 p.m. in the library of the State Capitol. I will be presenting with Ms. Carrie Gentry, wife of Tennessee State University’s iconic coach and professor Howard C. Gentry, about whom she has written a book. We will each read from our respective works and then there will be a moderated discussion on race. I’m really, really looking forward to the realization of this dream and the chance to meet Ms. Gentry and hear her take on issues that matter so much.

But really, regardless of your interest in the book or your proximity to Nashville, thank you all so very much for stopping by. I do write pieces here about ideas that interest me – mostly topics connected to the Civil Rights Movement, social justice, or cultural geography. On Wednesdays, I post photos. I hope many of you return to the blog, but even if you don’t, I appreciate you taking the time to read my tribute to the two very different kinds of visionaries we lost on Oct. 5 – Fred Shuttlesworth and Steve Jobs.

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Back in May, I envisioned spending a lot of time with this blog this summer, reading up on issues and then waxing philosophic in this space.  It ends up I haven’t been spending much time in the blogospere, but that’s because I’ve been working on my new project, enjoying friends and time outside, and, oh yeah, setting up readings!

Last Friday, I read at Malaprop’s Bookstore and Cafe in Asheville, NC. In a world where independent bookstores are folding like….umm…stuff that folds. (hey, I told you I’m saving my best writing for the new project), Malaprop’s is a proud exception.  They have readings and events all the time, which they promote like crazy. They keep the store open during readings to encourage walk-ins, and they usually group the readings into a lecture series of sorts. This summer, they are focusing on Southern Culture, so Confederate Streets fit in like…well…things that fit in.

You can check out a list of their other offerings here. I really wanted to hear about moonshine on Saturday night, but I was off hiking in the Smokies as research for my next project. (life is tough. 😉

THIS week brings a three-city “tour” of sorts. At 11 a.m. on Thursday, I will be revisiting the church where I grew up (and am still a member), Calvary United Methodist on Hillsboro Road in Nashville, and sharing at their Adult Fellowship. This requires reservations, so please call Libby at (615)297-7562 if you wish to come.

If you live in Birmingham, know people who live in Birmingham, or just want to take a drive down to this fine Alabama city, come on out to The Little Professor Bookshop , which is in Homewood, at 5 p.m. on Friday for the reading. I will be signing books until 8. Like Asheville, Birmingham is new territory for me, but I do believe that the stories in Confederate Streets will resonate there. It’s just a matter of getting the word out.

And, finally, on Saturday, I’ll bring it back to the ‘Noog. It’s hot out, so why not come up to Signal Mountain where the breeze always blows? I will be reading at Wild Hare Books (in the shopping center across from Pruett’s) at 2 p.m. The store’s owner, Linda Wyatt (mother of a McCallie alumnus) will be baking cookies. I know that sealed the deal for me. 🙂

For those of you who have been listening to “Around and About” on WUTC, the interview hit some glitches and I have to go redo it today. It should air TOMORROW (Wednesday).

Thank you so much to all of you who read this blog and have come out to hear about Confederate Streets. It’s been a great spring and summer.  I hope to see more of you (and your friends!) this week.

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Confederate Streets is hitting the road this summer. I’m excited about combining my love for road trips with the chance to meet up with old friends and share my work with more people. Here are the dates so far:

Friday, July 15, 7 p.m.  – Malaprop’s Bookstore; Asheville, North Carolina

Thursday, July 21, 11 a.m. – Adult Fellowship @ Calvary United Methodist Church; Nashville, Tennessee (reservations required)

Friday, July 22, 5-8 p.m. – Little Professor Book Center; Homewood, Alabama

Saturday, July 23, 2-4 p.m. – Wild Hare Books; Signal Mountain, Tennessee

Looks like fun, no? I am pleased to be able to travel to Asheville and read in Malaprop’s – my favorite bookstore in one of my favorite cities. I’m also pretty excited about the mini book tour through Nashville, Birmingham, and Chattanooga the following weekend.

Do you think you might want to come? Would you like to help promote a reading? Would you like me to come read in your city? Please leave a comment below or send me a message on Facebook.

Busy summer? Never fear. I will also be one of hundreds of authors set up at the Southern Festival of Books in Nashville  from October 14-16. Come on out and say howdy. The Festival of Books never disappoints.

See you on the road!

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